- Candidate Interview Advice

The main objectives of a job interview are to secure a second interview or get a job offer. At this stage, the interviewer has almost certainly seen and discussed your CV with Tribus and therefore you can assume your skills and experience broadly match those required for the job. The interview provides you with the chance to really sell your personality and convince the interviewer of your suitability for the position. 

- Five Fundamentals - 

Confirm the interview appointment with the relevant Tribus consultant and check how to get to the interview location. This is best done by telephone or by email. Confirm the name of your interviewer, their title and the correct pronunciation of their name. 
 
Check that you have names and addresses of referees and ensure they will provide good references. These details should be arranged prior to the interview, as calling to change a referee will give a poor impression. 
 
Study your CV and prepare answers to the most likely questions. Preparation time is rarely wasted. Please note Tribus recruitment does not change the content of your CV and would have only made additions with your consent. 
 
Research the company, the job, its policies, products and/or services and, if relevant, the person who will be conducting the interview. Your consultant will be happy to help you with this information. 

- Preparation - 

CV - Answering and Asking Questions 

It is vital to be familiar with your CV. Identify your strengths and weaknesses and be prepared to explain both changes in employment and career. Be honest ­it shows maturity if you can articulate why you took certain decisions. 
 
Prepare for the probable questions: How do you see yourself as an employee? What have you achieved, what are your goals/ambitions? Practice your answers in a mock interview with your consultant if possible, so that you know exactly what to say. Below are some more questions that are likely to be asked: 
- Describe your current job and responsibilities. 
 
- How do your skills and experience relate to this job? 
 
- What technologies and projects have you worked on? 
 
- What are your achievements in your current job? 
- Why do you want to change jobs? 
 
- Why are you interested in this job? 
 
- Why do you want to work for this company? 
 
- How do you work in a team? 
- What are your career objectives over the coming two or three years? 
 
- Where do you see yourself in five or ten year’s time? 
 
- What are your strengths and weaknesses? 
 
- What are your hobbies? 
- Describe your current job and responsibilities. 
 
- How do your skills and experience relate to this job? 
 
- What technologies and projects have you worked on? 
 
- What are your achievements in your current job? 
 
- Why do you want to change jobs? 
 
- Why are you interested in this job? 
 
- Why do you want to work for this company? 
 
- How do you work in a team? 
 
- What are your career objectives over the coming two or three years? 
 
- Where do you see yourself in five or ten years' time? 
 
- What are your strengths and weaknesses? 
 
- What are your hobbies? 

- Research - 

Make sure you know what the job entails ­ get a job description or ask for clarification. 
 
Go to the interview with some knowledge of the company - it demonstrates interest and initiative and enables you to ask the interviewer questions. Asking questions indicates self-confidence and demonstrates communication skills, a prerequisite for many jobs. Below is a list of possible questions to ask: 
- What are the initial responsibilities of the job? 
 
- Who would I be reporting to? 
 
- What sort of training programme is available? 
- What are the training opportunities? 
 
- How many other people will be working on my project / in my department? 
- What is the culture of the company? 
 
- What are the company's plans for future development? 
- What are the initial responsibilities of the job? 
 
- Who will I be reporting to? 
 
- What sort of training programme is available? 
 
- What are the training opportunities? 
 
- How many other people will be working on my project / in my department? 
 
- What is the culture of the company? 
 
- What are the company's plans for future development? 

Getting to the Interview 

If you have no idea how long the journey will take do a dummy run a day or two before. If possible, do this at the same time of day as the real journey so factors for delay, such as traffic, can be taken into account. If you are going to drive to the location, additional time to find a parking space must be allowed for. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

- Presentation - 

It is essential you are courteous and professional from the moment you arrive. Beware of your approach to the building as you never know who is watching. Check with the receptionist over the correct pronunciation of the interviewer's name and status. 
Appearance 
Dress in a professional style appropriate to that industry or company. 
 
This might mean contacting your consultant to ask what the dress code is. But for interview purposes it is always better to err towards more formal dress, so no sports socks or comic ties for example. Decide what you are going to wear several days in advance – this allows plenty of time for pressing, polishing etc. 
Pay attention to detail. 
 
Personal grooming is a vital element of your presentation and reinforces a professional attitude. It is worth bearing in mind that half of all interviewers make their hiring decisions in the first 60 seconds based on the candidate's appearance. 
Keep accessories to a minimum. 
 
Do not wear lots of jewellery or arrive laden down with bags. You need to look as though you are tidy and organised. 
Dress in a professional style appropriate to that industry or company. 
 
This might mean contacting your consultant to ask what the dress code is. But for interview purposes it is always better to err towards more formal dress, no sports socks are comic ties etc. Decide what you are going to wear several days in advance – this allows plenty of time for pressing, polishing etc. 
Pay attention to detail. 
 
Personal grooming is a vital element of your presentation and reinforces a professional attitude. It is worth bearing in mind that half of all interviewers make their hiring decisions in the first 60 seconds based on the candidate's appearance. 
Keep accessories to a minimum. 
 
Do not wear lots of jewellery or arrive laden down with bags. You need to look as though you are tidy and organised. 
Body Language 
 
Your entrance into the interview must create the right impression – head up, straight back and exuding energy. 
Shake hands firmly and smile 
 
The initial greeting creates a vital impression. Assert yourself in a positive manner without being overbearing. 
Do wait until you are offered a seat before sitting down. Sit reasonably still and keep your hands on your lap 
 
You do not want to distract the interviewer’s attention from what you are saying so try not to fidget or use your hands to talk. If the interview is going well, do not allow your body to relax to much – remain alert and interested in everything said. 
Maintain eye contact 
 
If there is more than one interviewer look at the one who is talking. This reinforces the impression that you are being open and honest. 
Punctuality 
 
Arrive early, 10-15 minutes is acceptable. This will allow you time to freshen up and have a few moments to collect your thoughts. It might also allow you to meet and / or observe members of staff, which can provide a valuable insight into the day to day running of the company. If you have any delay, telephone Tribus so we can advise the interviewer of your situation. 
Shake hands firmly and smile 
 
The initial greeting creates a vital impression. Assert your self in a positive manner without being overbearing. 
Do wait until you are offered a seat before sitting down. Sit reasonably still and keep your hands on your lap 
 
You do not want to distract the interviewer’s attention from what you are saying so try not to fidget or use your hands to talk. If the interview is going well, do not allow your body to relax to much – remain alert and interested in everything said. 
Maintain eye contact 
 
If there is more than one interviewer look at the one who is talking. This reinforces the impression that you are being open and honest. 
Punctuality 
 
Arrive early, 10-15 minutes is acceptable. This will allow you time to freshen up and have a few moments to collect your thoughts. It might also allow you to meet and / or observe members of staff, which can provide a valuable insight into the day to day running of the company. If you have any delay, telephone Tribus so we can advise them of your situation. 

- Interview - 

Skills 
 
Identify your accomplishments and strengths and know how to articulate them. Focus on the impression that you want to convey. Be prepared to convince the interviewer that you are uniquely qualified to make a contribution, both now and in the future. 
 
Knowledge  
 
Know why you want the job and why you would be well suited for the position. This will project self-confidence. 
Attitude 
 
Be enthusiastic and positive and remain courteous throughout the interview. For the purposes of the interview, this is the only job you want. Vague expressions of interest are pointless. Never run down or make snide comments about your present/previous employers/colleagues. Avoid arguments over detail and never be offensive. Be firm and persuasive but never lose your temper. 
 
Composure ­  
 
Listen carefully to each question being asked. Do not be afraid to sit and think before answering. This will enable you to be concise and sincere and stop you from rambling. 
Salary  
 
Try to avoid if possible. If asked about your required salary, you can give a rough figure but finish with comments such as; although I am open to offers or although it’s the position which is my main concern.' Mentioning a high figure will put the client off and a low one only benefits the client. You must always remember if possible to let us act on your behalf. It is also in our interest to get you as much as possible while not damaging your chances. 

- Closing - 

There is always the opportunity to ask the interviewer questions at the end of the interview. Use this chance to demonstrate that you have done some research on the company, and to further clarify any grey areas.­ You need to show you want to join them. 
 
If it has not already been made clear by the end of the interview, ask if there is anything lacking in your knowledge/experience which could be a problem. If yes, ask if there is anyway in which you can work on any problem areas and demonstrate a change at a second interview. 
 
Do not be afraid to ask about the next step of the recruitment process. Questions phrased in the right manner will not appear pushy and will provide a useful timescale as to when you can expect to know if you have been successful. 
Benefits and Terms and Conditions for employment are best left for discussion in subsequent interviews or at a later date with your consultant. 
 
As the interview closes, thank the interviewer for their time and confirm your interest in the position and company. 

- The follow-up - 

Upon leaving the company, contact your Tribus consultant immediately to pass on feedback from the interview. This allows us to contact the client ASAP to show your interest and to pre-empt any problems that arose during the interview. 
 
As the interview was arranged by Tribus, ensure that you only communicate through Tribus and do not approach the company directly for feedback. 
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